Last year saw multiple high-profile data breaches, enough to place cybersecurity atop any in-house attorney’s 2018 priority list.

But the threat posed by hackers isn’t the only cyber concern on the minds of in-house counsel this year, reports Corporate Counsel magazine.

In the regulatory realm, complying with the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation, which takes effect in May,  is expected to be companies’ top data privacy task of 2018. But it’s not the only one. The Chinese government also plans to impose new, below-the-radar data privacy regs that will make companies jump through another set of legal hoops.

The legal implications of new technologies, such as fitness devices that blur the line between medical and personal data collection, are also expected to challenge corporate counsel. And groundbreaking legal cases could change the law regarding who has standing to sue following a data breach in the U.S. and whether companies can use standard contractual clauses to transfer personal data out of Europe.

Ransomware, data breaches, and emerging artificial intelligence — these are some of the cybersecurity trends that executives expect to spill into the coming year with some newer challenges, according to eWeek.

The 2017 data leaks, hacks and attacks that alarmed industries across sectors will only grow more common. Cybersecurity leaders say they expect businesses to continue to innovate practices that bolster their privacy and create consumer products that offer a more comprehensive package of protections against malware, credit theft and identity fraud.

Looking ahead to 2018, regulators are raising the bar for data protection standards for corporations. For example, the EU will enforce General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR), which obligate organizations to comply with specific security improvement practices and approaches. Smaller businesses are expected to leverage multifactor authentication systems for password-protected accounts.

Read more about 2018 cybersecurity trends.

When it comes to cybercrime, not even your favorite app store is safe.

The International Business Times reports that fake mobile applications carried by the most popular app stores often pose phishing and malware threats. Hackers create the apps to control parts of users’ mobile phones, flood devices with spam ads and steal personal information.

They’re not always easy to spot. The more sophisticated counterfeits are designed to resemble legitimate games, e-commerce portals and social media apps. A fake version of WhatsApp, named “Update WhatsApp Messenger” had more than one million downloads before it was flagged and removed from one provider’s app store.

For information how to recognize fake apps and tips for users who have already made the mistake of downloading one, click here to read the full story.

Physicians have their hands full on the best of days. It’s not difficult to imagine why using a voice assistant such as Amazon’s Alexa or Apple’s Siri might be attractive.

In fact, a recent survey showed nearly one in four physicians uses the assistants for work-related purposes, such as researching prescription drug dosing. It’s likely many are unaware of the information security dangers they pose.

In an interview with SCG Health Blog, Fox Rothschild attorneys Elizabeth Litten and Michael Kline explain that the labor-saving devices pose a bevy of data privacy and security risks, and offer doctors six helpful tips for protecting their practices.

A new study notes that despite record spending on cybersecurity, overconfidence may be hurting companies’ ability to protect against data breaches.

Tech publication Information Week reports that the survey of IT professionals, by security firm Gemalto, showed that while 94 percent of respondents said their perimeter security was effective, nearly a third reported breaches within the last 12 months. Surprisingly, 14 percent said they would not trust their own organization to safeguard their personal data.

Why the disconnect? Experts interviewed by Information Week chalked it up to a lack of understanding of cybercrooks’ motivations, and a general lack of knowledge about cybersecurity in corporate C-suites. Click here to read the full story.

Cybercrooks’ preferred path to critical data is through privileged accounts, those held by users who have broad access and powers within the target’s network.

That’s according to a recent survey conducted by the cybersecurity firm Thycotic at the recent Black Hat conference in Las Vegas, reported Infosecurity Magazine.  About a third of respondents named privileged accounts the fastest and easiest path to critical data, while user email accounts were a close second at 27 percent.

Some 85 percent said human error, not inadequate security or unpatched software, was most to blame for security breaches.

Hackers’ biggest headaches? Multifactor authentication and encryption, according to the survey.

 

 

 

 

 

One way to measure the increasing importance of cybersecurity to American businesses is to track how often the issue arises as a risk factor in corporate filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

A recent analysis by Bloomberg BNA charted a dramatic rise over the past six years, with only a tiny fraction of businesses citing cybersecurity risks in 2011 SEC filings compared to a substantial percentage in the first six months of 2017.

The report notes that a likely reason for the increase was SEC guidance issued in 2011 that clarified when cyber incidents should be disclosed in financial filings, leading to cybersecurity’s being “elevated into the general counsel’s office [and onto] the board’s agenda.”

Read more at Bloomberg BNA’s article Corporate Cyber Risk Disclosures Jump Dramatically in 2017.

On March 15, Fox Rothschild partner Scott Vernick will participate in a panel discussion on Developments in Data Privacy & Security as part of the 2017 Argyle Chief Legal Officer Leadership Forum. The Forum will take place from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Convene Conference Center at 730 3rd Ave in New York City.

Scott L. Vernick, Partner, Fox Rothschild LLPScott and his fellow panelists will discuss the evolution of the GC role to include cybersecurity and data privacy, how cybersecurity fits into an organization’s risk management structure, as well as proactive risk assessments GCs can use to identify and prioritize critical assets and data for their business. Attendees will also receive information on new regulatory challenges, how GCs can best collaborate with and advise other organization leaders on the topic of cybersecurity, and working with outside counsel on these and related issues. The panel discussion is scheduled from 10:10 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

To register for the event, please visit the Argyle Forum event page.

New innovations come hand in hand with new privacy issues.  Privacy policies may seem like a last minute add-on to some app developers but they are actually an important aspect of an app.  Data breaches are an imminent risk and a business’s first defense to potential problems is a privacy policy.

Fordham University in New York hosted its Ninth Law and Information Society Symposium last week where policy and technology leaders came together to discuss current privacy pitfalls and solutions.  Joanne McNabb, the California attorney general’s privacy education director and a leader in policies affecting the privacy agreements of companies such as Google and Apple, emphasized in a panel that she “wants to make the case for the unread privacy policy.”  She noted that the policy mainly promotes “governance and accountability [and] it forces an organization to be aware of their data practices to some degree, express them and then therefore to stand behind them.”  The privacy policy still matters because it protects businesses from the risks associated with having a high level of data. It is especially necessary for those businesses that depend solely on private information because they are at a higher risk of breach.

The FTC (Federal Trade Commission) has suggested using an approach called “Privacy By Design” which is a method of imbedding privacy protections into the infrastructure of the app.  This approach removes the concern of implementing privacy policies post-development. Another method of simplifying the privacy policy is the alert prompt that some apps have employed to consistently give consumers notice of when and where their information is used. McNabb and her fellow panelists found this method of “short, timely notices” helpful in closing the gap between the unread privacy policies and the claimed “surprise” of consumers who blame an app for the dissemination of information.

As the industry moves forward, privacy will become an even greater part of the equation. Whether a privacy policy is read is insignificant. The protections it puts in place for all parties involved are crucial. As apps and technologies become more connected to the private preferences of consumers, businesses with a leg up on privacy protections will thrive against the backdrop of those who view privacy as a second tier requirement.

For more information on “Privacy By Design” click here.

The freedom from automated calls at random hours of the evening may seem like the true American dream these days as more and more companies rely on these calls to reach out and communicate with customers.  Unfortunately, now that the Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”) voted to expand the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (“TCPA”) to include stringent yet vague restrictions on telemarketing robocalls, it may not be a dream for everyone. 

In June of this year, in a 3-2 vote, the FCC voted on adding the rule to the TCPA that entails barring companies from using “autodialers” to dial consumers, disallowing more than one phone call to numbers that have been reassigned to different customers, and mandating a stop to calls under a customer’s wishes.  These restriction may seem reasonable but dissenting Commissioner, Ajit Pai, recognized that the rule’s broad language will create issues because it does not distinguish between legitimate businesses trying to reach their customers and unwanted telemarketers.  Some attorneys have further commented on the rule stating that its use of “autodialer” opens up a can of worms of interpretations and can really be viewed as any device with even the potential to randomly sequence numbers, including a smartphone.  Companies using even slightly modernized tactics to reach out to their customer base are now at risk of facing litigation—and it won’t stop there.  Businesses that legitimately need to reach out to their customers will be caught between a rock and a hard place as they face a one-call restriction now and may also open themselves up to litigation if a customer decides to take that route.

The FCC Chairman, Tom Wheeler, attempted to quash concerns by stating that “Legitimate businesses seeking to provide legitimate information will not have difficulties.”  This statement unfortunately won’t stop plaintiff’s attorneys from greasing their wheels to go after companies who even make “good faith efforts” to abide by the new rule.  Attorneys who defend businesses have recognized that the rule is ridden with issues that could potentially harm companies that simply do not have the mechanisms to fully control and restrict repeated calls or the technology that makes those calls.  But, long story short, just because this rule has been put in motion, does not mean it will stand as is. Litigation and court action will likely be a natural consequence and that may result in changes for the future.  For now, businesses that utilize automated phone calls should be wary of the technology used and attempt to at least keep track of numbers and phone calls made.  When in doubt, talk to an attorney to make sure you are taking the appropriate precautions.