“Whenever we make a call, go to work, search the web, pay with our credit card, we generate data. While de-identification might have worked in the past, it doesn’t really scale to the type of large-scale datasets being collected today.”

It turns out that ” four random points (i.e. time and location where a person

Canada has introduced a Digital Charter that will entail considerable changes to its privacy law, PIPEDA.

The principles are:

  1. Universal Access: equal opportunity to participate in the digital world and the tools to do so.
  2. Safety and Security: rely on the integrity, authenticity and security of services and feel safe online.
  3. Control and Consent: control

“Privacy Commissioner of Canada Daniel Therrien believes the question about whether privacy legislation should be amended is in the past. It is no longer should the country’s privacy laws be amended, but what is the best way to do so, and with the announcement of the country’s Digital Charter, the commissioner said the federal government

Republican U.S. Sen. Josh Hawley plans to propose a bill that would let consumers block all websites from collecting unnecessary data.

The proposal would allow consumers to choose a single setting that opts out of all data collection “beyond what is indispensable to the companies’ online services.”

The bill would impose fines against companies of

A study shows that “92 percent of 36 mental health apps shared data with at least one third party — mostly services that help with marketing, advertising, or data analytics.”

“About half of those apps did not disclose that third-party data sharing, for a few different reasons: nine apps didn’t have a privacy policy at

Utah legislators voted unanimously to pass landmark legislation in support of a new privacy law that will protect private electronic data stored with third parties like Google or Facebook from free-range government access.

The bill stipulates that law enforcement will be required to obtain a warrant before accessing “certain electronic information or data.” There are

The European Data Protection Board (EDPB) has weighed in on the ePrivacy Regulation:

  • EU legislators should intensify efforts towards the adoption of an ePrivacy Regulation, which is necessary to complete the EU’s framework for data protection and confidentiality of communications.
  • The ePrivacy Regulation must under no circumstances lower the level of protection offered by the

Despite their distrust in tech giants and lack of confidence in their privacy practices, people aren’t likely to go out of their way to safeguard their information, shows a survey of nearly 4,000 people across generations.

Per the survey:

  • 33 percent of respondents claim to read end user license agreements
  • 66 percent either skim through

Show me the money and I’ll show you my data.

“How much would you charge a marketer to use your personally identifiable information for general advertising purposes?”

About 60 percent of 2,000 U.S. adults polled in November 2018 were willing to share personal data for a price. A majority (57 percent) said it was worth

The U.S. Government Accountability Office recommends that Congress consider comprehensive federal internet privacy legislation.

Issues that should be considered include:

  1. Which agency or agencies should oversee Internet privacy.
  2. What authorities an agency or agencies should have to oversee Internet privacy, including notice-and-comment rulemaking authority and first-time violation civil penalty authority.
  3. How to balance consumers’ need