The $5 billion fine levied against Facebook by the Federal Trade Commission is certainly headline news, but it also contains detailed requirements for privacy and information security governance and accountability that all companies can learn from and implement.

Big Picture Takeaways:

  • Facebook faces many detailed requirements for internal and external governance and oversight with

Don’t store users’ passwords in cleartext. Really.

It’s not a good idea. Also, it may be deemed a ‘knowing violation’ of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) requirement to adequately protect personal data.

That is one key takeaway from the GDPR enforcement action by the State Commissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information

Data-rich companies like Facebook have a unique opportunity to capitalize on the recent surge in regulatory scrutiny and turn it to their advantage.

Savvy tech companies are attuned to public opinion and won’t allow others to control the narrative. They are already taking steps to regain the upper hand in the privacy debate.

Facebook demonstrated

Copyright: argus456 / 123RF Stock Photo
Copyright: argus456 / 123RF Stock Photo

Fox Rothschild partner Scott L. Vernick was quoted in The New York Times article, “Hacking Victims Deserve Empathy, Not Ridicule.” Full text can be found in the September 2, 2015, issue, but a synopsis is below.

While some data breach victims may face only

Boing Boing has an excellent how-to located here on how to opt out of being included in LinkedIn’s social media advertising. Briefly, LinkedIn assumes that you consent to LinkedIn’s use of your image in the adverstising of its sponsor’s products. If you recommend your CPA firm, and your CPA firm purchases advertising on LinkedIn, your photo may appear in that advertising.
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I have written about the problems arising when jurors post comments on Facebook and other social networking sites during a trial. Now a survey from Reuters Legal reveals some troubling statistics regarding the extent of the problem. According to the survey, since 1999, at least 90 verdicts have been challenged due to internet-related juror conduct, with at

 With the ever-growing popularity of social networking sites, and with so many employees exercising poor judgment online, it’s easy to understand why employers are concerned about the messages and images that that their employees are disseminating on these websites.

For employers, the costs are real: Poor choices by their employees can bring with it

As more courthouses offer wireless Internet access, trial attorneys and those assisting them now have the ability to hop on the internet during jury selection and check out the potential jurors in front of them. Legal Productivity has an interesting article offering tips for trial lawyers on using information on jurors’ social networking sites to