Data Security Breach Response

By Elizabeth Litten

The widely publicized pre-Christmas breach of confidential data held by Stratfor Global Intelligence Service (“Stratfor”), a company specializing in data security, reminded me that very little (if any) electronic information is truly secure. If Stratfor’s data can be hacked into, and the health information of nearly 5 million military health plan (TRICARE) members

Citigroup’s recent data breach stands out like a sore thumb. The breaches about which we normally hear have to do with retailers and service providers. Those businesses are the ones that do not appreciate the importance of protecting data, feel they could use the money necessary to create good security in better ways and are the easy targets for hackers. Thankfully, what we generally do not hear about are data breaches at large financial institutions.
Continue Reading Citibank Data Breach: Even the Banks Can’t Get It Right

Sony announced yesterday that its PlayStation Network and Qriocity services were compromised by an “unauthorized” person. What was the haul? According to Sony, the “name, address (city, state, zip), country, email address, birthdate, PlayStation Network/Qriocity password and login, and handle/PSN online ID” and the “profile data, including purchase history and billing address (city, state, zip), and your PlayStation Network/Qriocity password security answers” of 77 million individuals.
Continue Reading Sony Hit By Data Breach Affecting 77 Million Gamers

The cost per customer record in a data breach increased $10 over the 2009 average to $214 per customer record compromised in a data breach, which is $12 more than the 2008 average of $202 per customer record. The Poneman Institute, which conducts independent research on privacy, data protection and information security policy, released its sixth Annual Study: U.S. Cost of Data Breach, declaring that the average cost per compromised customer record rose to $214. The report is sponsored by Symantec Corporation. Excellent materials such as an infographic, summaries, blog entries, a podcast and slide presentation were also published in connection with the Annual Study.
Continue Reading Doing the Math: Average Data Breach Cost Now Up to $214 Per Record

A recent analysis of the past year’s data breaches by Imperva concludes that, in 2010, there has been a nearly 200% increase over 2009. Conversely, the number of records compromised shrank nearly 100% — from 230 million records in 2009 to 13 million records in 2010. These results are based upon information provided by the Privacy Clearinghouse

Last year, Governor Schwarzenegger “terminated” the proposed update to California´s landmark privacy protection law proposed by State Senator Joe Simitian (D-Palo Alto). The Governor’s office encouraged Rep. Simitian to reintroduce the amendment. This Bill was approved by the California Senate last Thursday.
Continue Reading California Data Breach Notification Revision Gets New Life

ECMC reported last Friday, March 26th, that a data breach occurred over the weekend of March 20-21. During this breach, which has been termed a “theft,” data was stolen that included names, addresses, dates of birth and social security numbers of some 3.3 million individual student loan borrowers.
Continue Reading Data Breach Affecting 3.3 Million Borrowers with Student Loans

The cost per customer record in a data breach increased $2 over the 2008 average to $204 per customer record compromised in a data breach. The Poneman Institute, which conducts independent research on privacy, data protection and information security policy, released its fifth annual report (Available Here) declaring that the average cost per compromised customer record rose to $204. The report is sponsored by PGP Corporation.
Continue Reading Data Breach Costs Increase to $204 per Compromised Record