Data-rich companies like Facebook have a unique opportunity to capitalize on the recent surge in regulatory scrutiny and turn it to their advantage.

Savvy tech companies are attuned to public opinion and won’t allow others to control the narrative. They are already taking steps to regain the upper hand in the privacy debate.

Facebook demonstrated

This blog post is the sixth and final entry of a six-part series discussing the best practices relating to cyber security. The previous post discussed the individuals and organizations that should be notified once a cyberattack occurs. This post will focus on what a business should not do after a cyberattack. Key points include (1) not using the network, (2) not sharing information with unconfirmed parties, and (3) not attempting to retaliate against a different network.
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This blog post is the fifth entry of a six series discussing the best practices relating to cyber security. The previous post discussed the important steps that a business should take to preserve evidence and information once a cyberattack has been identified. This post will discuss the individuals and organizations that should be notified once a cyberattack occurs. The four most important groups to contact are (1) individuals within the business, (2) law enforcement officials, (3) The Department of Homeland Security, and (4) other possible victims.
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This blog post is the third installment of a seven-part series discussing the best practices relating to cyber security. The first two blog posts discussed the best practices for preparing a business in case of a cyberattack. This post will discuss the initial steps that a business should take after a cyberattack occurs.
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Cyber-attacks can impact any business regardless of size, sector, or level of cyber security. The best way to minimize damages from a cyber-attack is to plan ahead and prepare for a possible attack. Forward thinking can minimize damages and shorten the process of recovery from a cyber-attack. The following suggestions are important steps that every business should take to prepare for a cyber-attack.
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[Also posted at http://hipaahealthlaw.foxrothschild.com/]

This case has nothing to do with HIPAA, but should be a warning to zealous covered entities and other types of business entities trying to give patients or consumers more information about data privacy than is required under applicable law.  In short, giving individuals more information is not better, especially where

The Security and Exchange Commission’s Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations (OCIE) recently released an initial summary of its findings from its 2014 OCIE Cybersecurity Initiative.  The OCIE examined 57 registered broker-dealers and 49 registered investment advisers to better understand how broker-dealers and advisers address the legal, regulatory, and compliance issues associated with cybersecurity.

Officials from both the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and European Union (EU) recently called for enhancements to the Obama administration’s proposed Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights.

The White House’s proposed Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights seeks to provide “a baseline of clear protections for consumers and greater certainty for companies.”  The guiding principles of

On December 31, 2014, the Federal Trade Commission announced that it approved a final order settling charges against Snapchat.

In its complaint, the FTC charged Snapchat with deceiving consumers over the amount of personal data that it collected and the security measures in place to protect the data from disclosure and misuse.

The settlement order