The Illinois Supreme Court’s Ruling

On January 25, 2019, the Illinois Supreme Court issued its long awaited opinion in Rosenbach v. Six Flags Entertainment Corp, ruling that the Illinois Biometric Privacy Act, 740 ILCS 14/1 et seq. (“BIPA”) does not require an actual injury for a plaintiff to be considered “aggrieved” under the Act. The

This blog post is the sixth and final entry of a six-part series discussing the best practices relating to cyber security. The previous post discussed the individuals and organizations that should be notified once a cyberattack occurs. This post will focus on what a business should not do after a cyberattack. Key points include (1) not using the network, (2) not sharing information with unconfirmed parties, and (3) not attempting to retaliate against a different network.
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This blog post is the fifth entry of a six series discussing the best practices relating to cyber security. The previous post discussed the important steps that a business should take to preserve evidence and information once a cyberattack has been identified. This post will discuss the individuals and organizations that should be notified once a cyberattack occurs. The four most important groups to contact are (1) individuals within the business, (2) law enforcement officials, (3) The Department of Homeland Security, and (4) other possible victims.
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On July 20, 2015, in Remijas v. Neiman Marcus Group, LLC, No. 14-3122 (7th Cir. 2015), the Seventh Circuit held that the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois wrongfully dismissed a class action suit brought against Neiman Marcus after hackers stole their customers’ data and debit card information.  The District

This is the second installment in a seven-part discussion on the best practices to prevent a cyberattack. The first part discussed four critical steps to prepare a business in the case of a cyberattack. These included: (1) identifying the crucial assets and functions a business, (2) creating an Response Plan, (3) installing the appropriate technology, and (4) obtaining authority for network monitoring. This article builds on those steps by suggesting further best practices in order to prevent a cyberattack.
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In response to a data breach in 2014, employees of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center filed a two-count class action complaint against UPMC for (1) negligence and (2) breach of an implied contract for failing to protect their personal data. The employee plaintiffs alleged that their Social Security numbers, names, addresses, birthdates, W2 information and

Officials from both the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and European Union (EU) recently called for enhancements to the Obama administration’s proposed Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights.

The White House’s proposed Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights seeks to provide “a baseline of clear protections for consumers and greater certainty for companies.”  The guiding principles of

On December 31, 2014, the Federal Trade Commission announced that it approved a final order settling charges against Snapchat.

In its complaint, the FTC charged Snapchat with deceiving consumers over the amount of personal data that it collected and the security measures in place to protect the data from disclosure and misuse.

The settlement order

The FTCannounced yesterday a settlement with Epic Marketplace, an online advertising network, which prohibits Epic from further collection of data obtained by “browser sniffing” the surfing history of Internet users and requires Epic to destroy all previously collected data. The FTC did NOT ban “browser sniffing.”
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