The “new age” of internet and dispersed private data is not so new anymore but that doesn’t mean the law has caught up. A few years ago, plaintiffs’ cases naming defendants like Google, Apple, and Facebook were at an all-time high but now, plaintiffs firms aren’t interested anymore. According to a report in The Recorder, a San Francisco based legal newspaper, privacy lawsuits against these three digital behemoths have dropped from upwards of thirty cases in the Northern District of California i 2012 to less than five in 2015.
Continue Reading The Data is In… Privacy Internet Lawsuits are Out

A recent District of Nevada ruling could cause issues for consumers in data breach class action cases moving forward. On June 1, 2015, the court ruled that a consumer class action against Zappos.com Inc. could not proceed because the class did not state “instances of actual identity theft or fraud.” The suit was brought as a result of a 2012 data breach where Zappos’ customers’ personal information was stolen, including names, passwords, addresses, and phone numbers. Even though the information was stolen, the court dismissed the case because the class could not prove that they had been materially harmed and had no other standing under Article III.
Continue Reading Further Thoughts on Data Breaches and Article III Standing