Is a U.S. federal privacy law in our future?

Combining the privacy protections included in three previously independent bills — the U.S. Consumer Data Protection Act, Filter Bubble Transparency Act and Deceptive Experiences To Online Users Reduction Act — Senate Republicans’ SAFE DATA Act  provides some of the strongest privacy protections to date, writes Müge

Time for a U.S. federal privacy law?

“U.S. Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., chairman of the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, will convene a hearing titled, “Revisiting the Need for Federal Data Privacy Legislation,” at 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, September 23, 2020.

The hearing will examine the current state of consumer data privacy and legislative

Leaders of key U.S. Senate and House committees wrote to the U.S. Secretary of Commerce and the Chairman of the Federal Trade Commission asking that they work closely and expeditiously with their European counterparts to issue interim guidance to make sure that consumer and business services are not unduly disrupted, and personal data is protected

Democratic Senators introduced a second COVID-19 privacy bill.

It addresses the collection and processing of data in connection with fighting the COVID-19 pandemic. This Democratic Senate bill shares a number of key points with the recently filed Republican Senate bill, among them:

  • consent required for collection and revocable
  • disclosure at collection
  • information security
  • data minimization

Beware the federal privacy bill.

“Although there are key differences, the two [federal privacy] bills also have important similarities:

  •  a set of individual rights combined with boundaries on how businesses collect, use, and share information.
  • individual rights including access, correction, deletion and portability for personal information, along with rights to give “affirmative express consent” before

“I have long advocated for privacy protections that include the principles of knowledge, notice and the right to say ‘no’ to companies that want our information. But it is increasingly clear that a true 21st-century comprehensive privacy bill must do more than simply enshrine notice and consent standards,” said Sen. Edward Markey (D-Mass.), the author

U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C.A recent bill proposed by the U.S. Senate states requirements for publicly traded companies to increase transparency about cybersecurity threats, risks and breaches. The bill includes disclosure standards such as having publicly owned companies reveal whether anyone on its board of directors has cybersecurity expertise or specialization. Companies would provide this information through U.S. Securities