In the wake of the UK A-Level algorithm fallout, the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has published a report, for public comment, on the Four Principles of Explainable Artificial Intelligence.

“AI is becoming involved in high-stakes decisions, and no one wants machines to make them without an understanding of why,” said NIST

“The U.S. must embrace technology such as artificial intelligence to improve the provision and efficiency of government services to the American people and ensure its application shows due respect for our Nation’s values, including privacy, civil rights, and civil liberties.” says the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy in its inaugural report on

“Data synthesis is an emerging privacy-enhancing technology that can enable access to realistic data, which is information that may be synthetic, but has the properties of an original dataset. It also simultaneously ensures that such information can be used and disclosed with reduced obligations under contemporary privacy statutes. Synthetic data retains the statistical properties of

The UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office shares its thoughts on the complexity of producing or deleting data used to train machine learning algorithms in data subject requests under GDPR.

Key points:

  • It can be be much harder to link to a particular individual but this is not the same as anonymization.
  • It may still be considered

“The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), while establishing a needed EU-wide privacy framework, will unfortunately inhibit the development and use of AI in Europe, putting firms in the EU at a competitive disadvantage to their North American and Asian competitors,” say the authors of a new report by the Center for Data Innovation in Washington.