The Illinois Supreme Court’s Ruling

On January 25, 2019, the Illinois Supreme Court issued its long awaited opinion in Rosenbach v. Six Flags Entertainment Corp, ruling that the Illinois Biometric Privacy Act, 740 ILCS 14/1 et seq. (“BIPA”) does not require an actual injury for a plaintiff to be considered “aggrieved” under the Act. The

Jeffrey L. Widman writes:

Fingerprint scanner, illustrating concept of biometricsIn 2008, the Illinois legislature enacted the Illinois Biometric Privacy Act, 740 ILCS 14/1 et seq. (“BIPA”) to provide standards of conduct for private entities in connection with the collection and possession of “biometric identifiers and information.” BIPA regulates the collection, use, safeguarding, handling, storage, retention and destruction of such biometric

A number of employers in Illinois are involved in pending class action litigation regarding violations of the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act. The BIPA, which was enacted in 2008, addresses the collection, use and retention of biometric information by private entities. Any information that is captured, stored, or shared based on a person’s biometric identifiers, such as fingerprints, iris scans, or blood type, is considered “biometric information.” The Illinois Legislature enacted the BIPA because biometric information is unlike any other unique identifier in that it can never be changed, even once it has been compromised.
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