U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Issues

In a complaint, the Federal Trade Commission alleges that between January 2017 and October 2018, RagingWire Data Centers, Inc. claimed in its online privacy policy that the company participated in the Privacy Shield framework and complied with the program’s requirements, even though it had allowed its certification to lapse in January 2018.

The Department of

“Company executives would face possible jail time for lying to the Federal Trade Commission about privacy and data security matters, under a new bill by U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, a Democrat representing Oregon,” reports Daniel R. Stoller, Esq. for Bloomberg Law.

“The Mind Your Own Business Act would give the FTC new authorities and resources

The FTC is stepping up privacy enforcement – reports Bloomberg Law‘s Sara Merken.

“The Federal Trade Commission is issuing specific data security requirements to companies as part of agency settlements, policing businesses more aggressively than before, attorneys and former staff said.”

“Mandates in related consent orders, such as directing senior officers to provide

Is the FTC’s Google-YouTube settlement a “game changer”?

“It’s three times larger than any privacy penalty assessed against Google anywhere else in the world, and it is 10 times larger than the civil penalties we have obtained in all of our 31 prior COPPA cases combined… A penalty of this magnitude sends a strong signal

The Federal Trade Commission and New York Attorney General have entered into landmark settlement with Google and YouTube for alleged violations of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) Rule.

The settlement requires Google and YouTube to pay $136 million to the FTC and $34 million to New York, the largest penalty since the law

The Federal Trade Commission has approved a final consent order settling charges that a background screening company falsely claimed to be in compliance with the EU-U.S. and Swiss-U.S. Privacy Shield frameworks.

SecurTest, Inc. agreed in June to settle FTC charges that its website falsely claimed that it participated in the EU-U.S. and Swiss-U.S. Privacy Shield

Tell me don’t sell me.

In a new settlement order with the Federal Trade Commission, Unrollme was ordered to notify all its active users of the fact that it accesses or collects email purchase receipts for use in market research products that are sold to third parties and to delete the information of anyone that

“The decision to impose documentation requirements, rather than bright line rules, represents a significant departure from how the government traditionally aims to protect the public. It is akin to if federal regulators, instead of ordering automakers to install seatbelts, ordered them to document the pros and cons of installing seatbelts, and to decide for themselves