EU Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC

Europe map with padlock symbolizing the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)With the European’s Union’s new General Data Protection Regulation (or GDPR) taking effect in less than 100 days, the interest of many U.S. Companies has been piqued as to how the GDPR may affect their overseas and internet-based businesses.  This article on CFO.com, “Why GDPR Matters,” which I co-authored with Bill Shipp from

EU and U.S. officials finally unveiled the full text of the proposed EU-U.S. Privacy Shield framework earlier this week. The agreement is the culmination of a five-month negotiation to address European concerns regarding mass surveillance and personal data protection issues surrounding transatlantic data transfers. The European Commission’s Article 29 Working Party must now review and

Critical infrastructure operators and multinational companies must fully disclose cybersecurity breaches and violations to European Union (EU) authorities or face severe penalties under a new EU cybersecurity law.

The law – the Network and Information Security Directive – is aimed at promoting transparency and cooperation between governments and global companies in the response to cyber

Businesses that relied previously on the EU’s Safe Harbor exception to transfer data from Israel to the United States have had that authorization revoked by the Israeli Law, Information and Technology Authority (ILITA).

It’s part of the ongoing ripple effect caused by the invalidation of Safe Harbor.

Now that Safe Harbor is off the table,

The RFID (radio frequency identification) camps are many and varied throughout the world. Privacy proponents are calling the security risks from RFID technology monumental and ripe for data and identity theft. The federal government has decided that when coupled with pin codes and/or protective sleeves, RFID technology used in passports and passport cards is safe. The European Commission has said it believes that RFID technology can be safe, provided its new recommendations are followed.
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