Prep for CCPA now, enjoy compliance later.

The Future of Privacy Forum’s Stacey Gray and Polly Sanderson’s comparison of two federal privacy bills shows that steps businesses are taking to comply with the CCPA will serve them well if a federal law is passed:

  • Revise your privacy notice; draft by category: Both bills require detailed

Beware the federal privacy bill.

“Although there are key differences, the two [federal privacy] bills also have important similarities:

  •  a set of individual rights combined with boundaries on how businesses collect, use, and share information.
  • individual rights including access, correction, deletion and portability for personal information, along with rights to give “affirmative express consent” before

A new comprehensive federal privacy bill, the Consumer Online Privacy Rights Act (COPRA), has been introduced by Senate Commerce Committee Ranking Member Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.) and Senators Ed Markey (D-Mass.) Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) and Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.).

Key novel provisions per International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP) Research Director Caitlin Fennessy:

  • individual consent for data

The Facial Recognition Technology Warrant Act, introduced by Sen. Chris Coons (D-Del.) would be the first federal restriction on law enforcement’s use of the technology, reports Sara Merken for Bloomberg Law.

“The bill…would require a court order based on probable cause before law enforcement could use facial recognition tools to conduct persistent tracking of a

Democratic U.S. Reps. Anna Eshoo and Zoe Lofgren have announced the Online Privacy Act, a proposal that would create a federal enforcement agency to protect privacy rights.

“The bill proposes the creation of the Digital Privacy Agency (DPA) that would have the power to enforce privacy rights for users and make sure companies follow the

“Privacy Commissioner of Canada Daniel Therrien believes the question about whether privacy legislation should be amended is in the past. It is no longer should the country’s privacy laws be amended, but what is the best way to do so, and with the announcement of the country’s Digital Charter, the commissioner said the federal government

Republican U.S. Sen. Josh Hawley plans to propose a bill that would let consumers block all websites from collecting unnecessary data.

The proposal would allow consumers to choose a single setting that opts out of all data collection “beyond what is indispensable to the companies’ online services.”

The bill would impose fines against companies of

The California Consumer Privacy Act “has galvanized the U.S. Congress to start thinking really hard about federal privacy legislation. We’ve encouraged them to do that,” said Federal Trade Commission Chairman Joe Simons.

Other key takeaways from Simons’ conversation with International Association of Privacy Professionals Chief Knowledge Officer Omer Tene:

  • Though not specifically commenting on any

“I have long advocated for privacy protections that include the principles of knowledge, notice and the right to say ‘no’ to companies that want our information. But it is increasingly clear that a true 21st-century comprehensive privacy bill must do more than simply enshrine notice and consent standards,” said Sen. Edward Markey (D-Mass.), the author

“What my bill aims to do is to provide a little bit more regulation, a little bit more oversight, into the information that is being collected on us, about us, every single day without our knowledge — a lot of times without our permission — and is being used in ways that can negatively affect