North Dakota, Utah, Washington State. .. all three have recently introduced new pieces of data privacy legislation.

UTAH

Utah State Rep. Walt Brooks, has introduced House Bill 80, which creates an “affirmative defense” for companies in lawsuits over data breaches, provided they can prove that they maintain up-to-date data security.

“It doesn’t give them immunity and it doesn’t release them from liability especially if they’re negligent,” said Brooks.

Another bill introduced in the legislature regulates the state’s use of facial recognition technology.

House Majority Leader Francis Gibson, has introduced House Bill 243, which creates a statewide “privacy officer” to look at how state and local governments use some tech and whether or not people’s personal information is protected.

Details from Fox 13 in Salt Lake City


Continue Reading New Data Privacy Legislation Introduced in West, Mountain States

The Washington Privacy Act is back and now includes provisions for handling personal data during a public health emergency such as a pandemic.

Its provisions are closer to the European Union’s General Data Privacy Regulation (GDPR) than the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and include:

  • Controller and processor obligations
  • Right of correction
  • Provisions regarding profiling

“Washington state residents would gain new rights to file lawsuits over data violations under an amended version of privacy legislation approved by a House technology committee,” reports Bloomberg Law’s Daniel R. Stoller, Esq.

“The House Innovation, Technology, Economic Development Committee approved the new version of the bill on a 6-3 vote.”

“The amendment, by committee

If it’s not broker(ed) why fix it?

A new data broker bill has been submitted to the Washington State House of Representatives, following in the footsteps of Vermont and California.

Per the bill, a broker will be required to register in a central registry and indicate:
  • Name and address
  • If it permits an opt out

Where California leads, others follow.

Washington state legislators will push for new regulations governing data privacy and facial recognition in 2020, reports GeekWire. The rules apply to companies located in Washington and companies that target services to Washington customers. Businesses that derive more than 50 percent of their revenue from the sale or processing of

Much like your credit report, where you can look and check who has been accessing and using your credit information and make corrections, so should be the case with the rest of your personal information – says, Sen. Reuven Carlyle, D-Seattle, the sponsor of Senate Bill 5376, passed by the Senate of Washington state.

The

On July 23, 2017, Washington State will become the third state (after Illinois and Texas) to statutorily restrict the collection, storage and use of biometric data for commercial purposes. The Washington legislature explained its goal in enacting Washington’s new biometrics law:

The legislature intends to require a business that collects and can attribute biometric data